Sequence composition of disordered regions fine-tunes protein half-life

The proteasome controls the concentrations of most proteins in eukaryotic cells. It recognizes its protein substrates through ubiquitin tags and initiates degradation at disordered regions within the substrate. Here we show that the proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of the regions at which it initiates degradation. Specifically, proteins in which the initiation regions have biased amino acid compositions show longer half-lives in yeast than proteins with unbiased sequences in the regions. The relationship is also observed on a genomic scale in mouse cells. These preferences affect the degradation rates of proteins in vitro, can explain the unexpected stability of natural proteins in yeast and may affect the accumulation of toxic proteins in disease. We propose that the proteasome’s sequence preferences provide a second component to the degradation code and may fine-tune protein half-life in cells.The paper by Susan Fishbain, Sreenivas Chavali et al can be viewed here.

Proteome response at the edge of protein aggregation

Proteins adopt defined structures and are crucial to most cellular functions. Their misfolding and aggregation is associated with numerous degenerative human disorders such as type II diabetes, Huntington’s or Alzheimer’s diseases. Here, we aim to understand why cells promote the formation of protein foci. Comparison of two amyloid-b-peptide variants, mostly insoluble but differently recruited by the cell (inclusion body versus diffused), reveals small differences in cell fitness and proteome response. We suggest that the levels of oxidative stress act as a sensor to trigger protein recruitment into foci. Our data support a common cytoplasmic response being able to discern and react to the specific properties of polypeptides. The paper by Natalia Sanchez de Groot can be viewed here.